fbpx

Category: Independent Living Skills

pexels-photo-707582.jpeg
Independent Living Skills

Independent Life Skills: Time Management

Time management is a system that priorities tasks based on what you want to accomplish. It involves three types of time including predictable, discretionary, and other-imposed time. The key to efficiently managing your time is by learning to maximize your discretionary time by using it efficiently. Often times, time management can be over looked and tossed to side. But, when learned correctly it can become a highly beneficial tool allowing you to accomplish all your goals and tasks efficiently and on time.

pen calendar to do checklist
Photo by Breakingpic on Pexels.com

Three Types of Time

Predictable Time

This form comes from activities that you can predict and plan around such as meetings, team practice, eating and sleeping.

Discretionary Time

This is uncommitted time that allows you to accomplish priorities in your life. The way you plan this time should be in line with your lifestyle. Another way to think of this would be free time that allows for you to choose the way you spend it.

Other Imposed Time

Other-imposed time is unpredictable. For example, emergencies or things that you weren’t expecting to have to do for your job or school would fall under this category.

Managing Your Time

The first step is to know yourself. For example, some thrive in the early morning but others get the most done late at night. Once you have determined the situations you thrive under you can begin to form your plan around that.

Organization is at the foundation of all time management skills. Find what works best for you whether that is a notebook, to-do list or calendar. It might take time for you to find what the best method is so try all of them!

To-do lists are the most common and best way to keep track of your tasks for the day and week. The key to an effective to-do list is prioritization. UC San Diego suggests that you should create your list based on the A,B,C criteria. For example, A would be the most important task you have, followed by B and finally C.

Additionally, schedule your time based on the three types of times mentioned above. Fill in your discretionary time that you had left blank with your highest priorities according to your lifestyle. Make sure you leave time for sleeping, eating, etc.

Below is a more advanced method to time management that could be beneficial to individuals looking to go further into the topic.

Previous Independent Life Skills Blogs:

Being On Time

Personal Hygiene

Eating a Balanced Diet

Self-Advocacy

Life Skills and Daily Activities

Lifestyle and Social Interaction

Transportation

adult city commuter group
Independent Living Skills

Independent Life Skills: Transportation

The style in which one lives their life can affect fulfillment and happiness. Community involvement can add a feeling of connection to an individuals life. Skills are needed to be able to successfully be involved with a community. For example, learning the skills safety and transportation allow for independence in the community. At times learning new skills or lifestyles can be overwhelming. It is important to start small and take steps toward bigger goals.

architecture buildings business city
Photo by Burst on Pexels.com

Public Transportation

Public transportation is a great way for someone to interact with others and gain independence. Often times, people are limited by their inability to drive themselves. Public transportation gives you the opportunity to pursue activities, hobbies and social interactions.

New skills can be scary causing someone to feel overwhelmed and stressed. It could be beneficial to accompany someone learning this new skill until they become more comfortable and confident. Overtime they will be able to use public transportation without anyones help.

Road Safety

Someone learning to become more independent with transportation it is important to become aware of road laws and safety. If they don’t have any experience with these rules it can be confusing. For example, if you have relied on a care taker to explain and guide you through transportation then you wouldn’t have a reason to learn these complex situations.

In addition, Endeavour Foundation recommends that you encourage your loved ones to take a road safety course to help learn the important skills needed to stay safe. Furthermore, it is important to practice these skills every time you use a form of transportation. Having these skills will give the individual confidence in themselves as well as peace of mind to their loved ones.

Previous Independent Life Skills Blogs:

Being On Time

Personal Hygiene

Eating a Balanced Diet

Self-Advocacy

Life Skills and Daily Activities

Lifestyle and Social Interaction

Sources:

Endeavour Foundation

diverse friends resting on embankment
Independent Living Skills

Independent Life Skills: Lifestyle & Social Interaction

The style in which one lives their life can affect fulfillment and happiness. Social interaction and independence are the main contributors to someone feeling satisfied and happy. At times learning new skills or lifestyles can be overwhelming. It is important to start small and take steps toward bigger goals.

Lifestyle

Independence and happiness start with being able to do fun things in your day-to-day life without the requirement of supervision. These day-to-day activities could include any hobby. For example, shopping can be an easy and fun activity for someone to accomplish on their own.

Shopping allows someone to get out into the community and start to gain more independence as confidence grows. For instance, this hobby might began by getting dropped off at the mall and once confidence as grown enough they could take the bus.

Hobbies can be a great way to gain experience and comfortability interacting in the community. They are also a potential event to socialize and create friendships.

If someone doesn’t have the confidence to learn new skills then household activities can be a beneficial place to start. For example, learning things like doing laundry, ironing, cleaning, and gardening can be simpler to monitor and less overwhelming.

Social Interaction

Relationships are an important part of everyone’s life. Whether these relationships are intimate or not they still have a major impact. Creating meaningful relationships takes certain and practice.

All relationships begin with social interaction and a good first impression can be impactful. Social skills needed to be learned and practiced just like every other skill in life.

Few basic social skills to learn:

  1. Confidence when introducing yourself
  2. Eye contact
  3. Personal space
  4. Common courtesy (Example: Holding a door open)
Previous Independent Life Skills Blogs:

Being On Time

Personal Hygiene

Eating a Balanced Diet

Self-Advocacy

Life Skills and Daily Activities

Sources:

Endeavour Foundation

asian businessman with briefcase on street staircase
Independent Living Skills

Independence Through Life Skills and Daily Activities

Independent life skills allow people to live the most meaningful and purposeful life. Skills that relate to working, playing, learning and daily living contribute to the goal of an independent and quality life.

Independence/Life Skills

According to the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disability, there are three elements of independence for people with disabilities.

  1. Individual Autonomy
  2. Opportunity to be actively involved in the decision-making process
  3. Opportunity to access the physical, social, economic, and cultural environment

Additionally, it is important to have independent life skills to work on. Here are a few common examples:

  • Personal Hygiene
  • Time Management
  • Dress/Clothing Care
  • Health Care and Nutrition
  • Home Management and Safety
  • Finance Management
  • Personal Growth, Awareness and Problem Solving
  • Community Access and Involvement

Growth of these life skills can improve self-esteem and willingness to take risks. The primary way to learn and see personal growth is through risk-taking.

Daily Skills

Every day is filled with activities called daily life skills that are needed to get through the day. For example, when getting ready for a day of work you start by taking a shower and followed by getting dressed, and making breakfast. All of these are daily skills and activities that everyone needs to live independently.

The list of daily skills and activities is long and potentially endless. But, Alpha School has managed to provide a list of ten essential skills for special needs children. A lot of these skills are used daily to provide for yourself.

  1. Self-Care
  2. Pre-Vocational Skills
  3. Daily Living Skills
  4. Community Instruction
  5. Leisure Skills
  6. Functional Reading
  7. Functional Math
  8. Workplace Skills
  9. Shopping Skills
  10. Cooking and Laundry

Impact of Employment

Employment provides so much more than income and the ability to pay your bills. Having a job provides purpose and meaning to one’s life. It also allows for social opportunities and a sense of accomplishment and fulfillment. By and large, the impact of employment is the same for people with disabilities.

There are resources for people with disabilities to help with job readiness and employment opportunities. These resources are available at the state and federal level but also companies like Soul Dogs, Inc. In fact, Soul Dogs, Inc. offers a job readiness program and job development and placement. Additionally, if one needs more support once placed in a job we will provide on the job coaching and support.

Previous Independent Life Skills Blogs:

Being On Time

Personal Hygiene

Eating a Balanced Diet

Self-Advocacy

cheerful young woman screaming into megaphone
Independent Living SkillsUncategorized

Independent Life Skills: Self-Advocacy

Self-Esteem

The concept of self-advocacy is founded on believing in yourself. In order to believe in yourself, one needs to know their own strengths and believe they are worthwhile. People with low self-esteem often struggle with being a self-advocate.

Improving one’s self-esteem can be a challenging task. Having a method or process that helps you improve the way you feel about yourself can be powerful. The American Addiction Centers Resource suggests people follow four overall methods: Assess, Appreciate, Support, and Improve.

Exercises to Raise Self-Esteem

Following specific exercises to improve self-esteem can be an effective start to advocating for yourself. These exercises come from the American Addiction Centers Resource.

  • Meet with a trusted friend and dedicate 10 minutes to complimenting each other
  • Read a book about building self-esteem
  • Write down everything good about yourself and read it back to yourself at night before bed
  • Do a good dead for your community

Steps to Being a Self-Advocate

Self-advocacy can be challenging. Some suggest that you follow steps to make the process easier and less overwhelming. The following ten steps come from mentalhealthrecovery.com. They provide a basic plan and strategy to become an effective self-advocate.

  • Believe in Yourself
  • Know your Rights
  • Decide what you Want
  • Get all the Facts
  • Plan a Strategy
  • Gather Support
  • Target your Efforts
  • Express yourself Clearly
  • Assert yourself Calmly
  • Be Firm and Persistent

The video below can provide additional information on self-advocacy and when to speak up for yourself.

Previous Independent Life Skills Blogs:

Being On Time

Personal Hygiene

Eating a Balanced Diet

Sources:

American Addiction Centers Resource

Mental Health Recovery